Dr Patricia Short
Dr Patricia Short
Head of School

t.short@uq.edu.au
Phone:  (+61 7) 336 52248
Fax:  (+61 7) 336 51544

Room 339, Level 3,
Michie Building (#9), St Lucia Campus
 

Qualifications:

BA - Hons (Sociology), University of Queensland
MA (Sociology), University of Queensland
Ph.D (Sociology), University of Queensland

Professional activities:

Member - The Australian Sociological Association

Background:

Lecturer, School of Social Science, The University of Queensland, 1998 - Present
Senior Tutor/Associate Lecturer, Department of Anthropology and Sociology, University of Queensland, 1984 - 1997
Senior Research Assistant, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, 1983 - 1984

Research interests:
  • Social Inequality, Household Vulnerabilities and Housing
  • Welfare Relations in the Informal Economy and 3rd Sector
  • Gender and Economic Change in Development Contexts

Please follow this link to find out more about Dr Short’s research profile.

Representative publications:

Jahirudden, ATM., P.M. Short, W. Dressler, and M.A. Khan (2011) ‘Can Microcredit Worsen Poverty?  Cases of exacerbated poverty in Bangladesh’, Development in Practice, 21, 8:1109-21.

Short, P.M., C. Parsell, R. Phillips, and N. Seage (2010) Bridging the Divide: the experiences of low-income households excluded from the private rental sector in Australia. Positioning Paper. AHURI, Melbourne.

Ambrose, A. and Short, P.M. (2009) ‘Integrating Health Planning and Social Planning: a case study in community-based partnerships for better health’, Australian Journal of Primary Health, 15, 294–302.

Short, P.M., Seelig, T, Warren, CMJ, Susilawati, C & Thompson, A. (2008), Risk assessment practices in the private rental sector: implications for low-income renters, Final Report No. 117, AHURI, Melbourne.

Seelig, T. et al (2007) Housing consumption patterns and earnings behaviour of income support recipients over time. Positioning Paper. AHURI, Melbourne.

Short, P.M., J. Minnery, E. Mead, M. O’Flaherty, and A. Peake (2006) "Tenancy databases, professional practices and housing access among low-income tenants in the private rental sector in Australia", International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 31(1).

 Short, P.M. (2005) ‘Mothers at the margins’ in A. O’Reilly, M. Porter, and P.M. Short (eds) Motherhood: Power and Oppression, Toronto, Canadian Women’s Press: 205-19

Seelig T et al (2005), Housing consumption patterns & earnings behaviour of income support recipients over time, AHURI Positioning Paper

Short, P., J. Minnery, B. Adkins, E. Mead, A. Peake, and D. Fredrick (2004) Tenancy Databases: Risk Minimisation and Outcomes, Final Report. Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, Melbourne.

O’Reilly, A., M. Porter, and P.M. Short (eds) (2005) Motherhood: Power and Oppression, Toronto, Canadian Women’s Press.

Short, P.M., T. Seelig, C. Warren, C. Susilowati and A. Thompson (forthcoming) Risk Assessment Practices in the Private Rental Sector: implications for low-income renters, AHURI Positioning Paper.

Short, P.M. (2005) ‘Mothers at the margins’ in A. O’Reilly, M. Porter, and P.M. Short (eds) Motherhood: Power and Oppression, Toronto, Canadian Women’s Press, pp.205-219.

Seelig T, J.Hoon Han, M. O’Flaherty, P. Short, M. Haynes, S. Baum, A. Jones, M. Western (2005), Housing consumption patterns & earnings behaviour of income support recipients over time, AHURI Positioning Paper.

Goos, M., D. Lincoln, A. Coco, S. Frid, P. Galbraith, M. Horne, L. Jolly, A. Kostogriz, T. Lowrie, P. Short, M. Gholam (2004) Home, School, Community Partnerships to support Children's Numeracy. Canberra, DEST.

Coco, A. and Short, P.M. (2004) ‘History and habit in the mobilisation of IT resources’, The Information Society, 20:1.

Short, P., Minnery, J. Adkins, B., Mead, E., Peake, A. and Fredrick, D., (2004) Tenancy Databases: Risk Minimisation and Outcomes, Final Report. Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, Melbourne.

Short, P.M. and A. Mutch (2002) ‘Exchange, reciprocity and citizenship – principles of access and the challenge to human rights in the third sector: an Australian perspective’, Social Justice, 28:4, pp.14-28.

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